Sculpting Myths: Yggdrasil

As promised, today I am sharing the next piece in my SCULPTING MYTHS series, YGGDRASIL: the Tree of Life.

Whether we speak of the Bodhi tree under which the Buddha sat, the tree(s) of knowledge in the Garden of Eden, the tree of life so central to the Celtic tradition; or those found in the mythologies of ancient Egypt, China, India and countless others, trees have played a major role in stories that seek to explain the world and our place in it. In many of them, the tree represents the connection between mortal man, the heavens and the other realms and often it is seen as the very thing that holds them in place and binds each to the other.

To this day, trees continue to be a staple in storytelling, from J.R.R. Tolkein’s Trees of Valinor in Middle Earth to James Cameron’s Home Tree of Pandora in Avatar.

Yggdrasil-copperYggdrasil-bronze

I chose to name this particular design YGGDRASIL which is the Tree of Life in the Norse tradition. It is the tree that connects all 9 realms of the Norse mythology and it is upon this tree that Odin, the All-Father sacrificed himself (to himself) as a means of acquiring knowledge. But whatever name I give it, the design is intended to represent trees appearing in all our myths and traditions and I hope it will bring you a sense of connectedness to the natural world.

Yggdrasil-stoneYggdrasil-stone-framed

This sculptural relief is 10 inches in diameter. It can be hung as a plaque and is also available framed in a high-quality shadowbox. Offered initially in three finishes – cold cast bronze, copper and stone – it is hand weathered and sealed for a long life, stamped on the back and accompanied by a signed certificate.

Made in the USA from start to finish and offered to the world in humble gratitude.

~Aric Jorn

2 thoughts on “Sculpting Myths: Yggdrasil

    1. Wanda,
      I hope you enjoy your exploration. It is a fascinating culture with a mythic tradition that never ceases to amaze and delight. I too am exploring my heritage (being Swedish and Danish) and enjoy interpreting the old stories for a modern audience.
      ~Aric

      Like

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