Tag Archives: Viking

Viking Prow: Drakkar

After a long delay and many requests from collectors, the second piece in my Viking Prow series is now in production and available for order.

Prow2-main.jpgThis series was originally conceived as a tribute to the mystery and majesty of ancient Scandinavian culture during the Viking Era in general, and specifically to celebrate the 950th anniversary of the battles of Stamford Bridge and Hastings. These twin battles mark what many consider to be the end the Viking Era. However, since the Normans (or North Men) who ultimately conquered England by defeating Harold II’s Anglo-Saxon army at Hastings in 1066 were themselves the descendants of Vikings, it is also the completion of a great story arc.

Like the first in the series released in 2015 (Viking Prow: Coiled Serpent), this second piece in the series stands an impressive 17 inches tall (slightly taller than the first) and is also a bit beefier overall with bolder lines and details. This is meant to reflect the brute power of the drakkar (dragon). Weighing about 4 pounds, it is a solid piece meant to stand on desk, shelf or pedestal.

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Each sculpture in this series is strictly limited to 95 signed and numbered castings along with a handful of artist proofs. They are cast, assembled and painted by hand, then clear-coated for a long life.

When this bold and brutish Viking Prow: Drakkar is placed beside the smoother lines and fine detail of the Serpent Prow, they are a wonderful pair. I am keen to make enough difference between each prow in this series that, were one to collect them all, they would have enough variety to represent a fleet of individually crafted ships.

An extremely limited number (10 to be exact) of these prows have been reserved as matched pairs, allowing you to have the corresponding edition number in both pieces. You can discover more about this opportunity here.

PROW-SET

As always, I thank my patrons who allow me to continue doing what I love.

~Aric Jorn

Voyages of Aric The Viking

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Here is my confirmed art show schedule for 2017. There are a few shows that have yet to complete their jurying process, so I will add to this schedule over the course of the summer as announcements are made.

As we get closer to individual shows, I will post booth numbers and other details about each venue. For now, I will simply say that I am extremely excited for this season. I have added several new shows to the rotation (KRASL, Edina, Oak Brook) and am also returning to several of my favorites (Art & Apples, East Lansing, Central PA). I am looking forward to reconnecting with friends, fellow artists and patrons whom I’ve known for years as well as meeting new ones. I hope to see you all at one of these excellent shows.

Until then, it’s back to the studio for me … I’ve much to get ready for.

~Aric

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Great Lakes Art Fair

Great Lakes Art Fair
April 7-9, 2017
Suburban Collection Showplace
Novi, MI

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BAF logo only

Art Birmingham
May 13-14, 2017
Birmingham, MI

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east lansing art festival

East Lansing Art Festival
May 20-21, 2017
East Lansing, MI

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Edina Art Fair

Edina Art Fair
June 2-4, 2017
Edina, Minnesota

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KRASL Art Fair on the Bluff

KRASL Art Fair on the Bluff
July 8-9, 2017
Lake Bluff Park
St Joseph, MI

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central penn festival of the arts

Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts
July 13-16, 2017
State College, PA

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a2 state street

Ann Arbor State Street Art Fair
July 20-23, 2017
Ann Arbor, MI

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fine art festival oakbrook center

Fine Art Festival: Oakbrook Center
August 19-20, 2017
Oak Brook, IL

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2017-Art-Apples

Art & Apples Festival
September 8-10, 2017
Rochester, MI

Moving Pictures

No, this isn’t a post about my favorite Rush album nor a piece on early American cinema, but rather a quick year end announcement. Last Tuesday, I packed up my car to deliver half a dozen pieces for two public exhibitions in which I am involved.

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The first is the premier exhibit at The Gallery, a new fine art venue in Saginaw (the Grand Opening of which was this past Friday night). Hanging alongside other noted Michigan artists, several of my pieces will be on display in rotation now through June 2017. The gallery is housed in the historic Bancroft building at E. Genesee and S. Water Street on the banks of the Saginaw River. This latest cultural attraction boasts 5,000 square feet of gallery space and I am delighted to be a part of it.

farmington-public-art-projectTwo of my pieces were also selected as part of the Farmington Hills Public Art Program. They will be on display at the City Hall of Farmington Hills now through December 2018. Having had a sneak preview of the other 70 works to be included during this two-year exhibit, I highly encourage you to check it out if you are in the area. City Hall is located at 31555, 11 Mile road in Farmington Hills, MI 48336.

I am truly excited for these and all the other opportunities that have come my way this year and cannot wait to share with you all that is in store for 2017. Until then, have a wonderful Winter Solstice, a joyful Yule, a merry Christmas, etc.

~Aric Jorn

Calendar Crows

My Odin’s Ravens: Hugin & Munin layered relief has enjoyed its share of attention since I completed it in late 2014. In 2015, it was featured on PBS’s Detroit Performs and this year it was part of several exhibitions including The Crow Show at the Arts Illiana gallery. For the coming year, Hugin and Munin will nest on the January page of the 2017 Pagan Calendar produced by the Windsong Foundation.windsong-calendar-2017-frontwindsong-calendar-2017-back

The Windsong Foundation’s mission is to lead people to the intersection of history and spiritual growth, celebrating ancient Norse, Celtic and Slavic traditions, rituals and cultures.

The calendar is available through Amazon.  All proceeds from the sale of these calendars go to support the foundation’s mission and to help fund the development of a 38 acre mountain property just outside of Lake George, Colorado, that will serve the pagan community and welcome people from around the world to discover the rich traditions of ancient europe.

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With over half of them now in private collections around the world, I am thrilled to see my Ravens as far flung as their namesakes and being included in the Windsong calendar allows them to reach an even wider audience, including those who are not in a position to purchase one of the original reliefs. I am thus grateful to the Windsong Foundation for helping me spread these fascinating stories of Norse mythology to a modern audience.

If you are interested in owning one of the original reliefs, about half of them (at the time of writing) are still available directly through my online shop. This includes a small number of pieces reserved as “matched sets” with the second piece in the series, the Wolves of Ragnarok: Skol & Hati.

As always, whether you choose to contact me privately or leave a public comment, I welcome your feedback and suggestions.

Skol!
~Aric

Faeries of the Wood

Faeries of the Wood is the latest in my triptych series where I attempt to capture a mythological story or concept in three 4-inch tiles.

faerie-triptych-blog

Faeries in their modern form have been capturing imaginations for two centuries having gained prominence in the Victorian Age. It was at this time that what we now think of as fairies (beautiful young girls with tiny dresses and delicate wings that spend their time flittering about in the woods) took hold. This image of the faery would eventually lead us to the ultimate form of “cute” fairy – Disney’s Tinkerbell.

To say that this is a far cry from the faeries found in works pre-dating the Victorian Age would be an understatement. While the faeries of old might occasionally help out a human, they were just as likely to be malicious tricksters who delighted in toying with the mortals they encountered. They were powerful and wild forces of nature. While the Victorian Age skewed our idea of faeries as beings far more consistently benevolent, they still retain their magic, mystery and deep connection to nature and these are after all the most important aspects of the faerie folk.

I will explore the earlier forms of faeries in future pieces, but decided to start with something more familiar. So, it is from the modern traditions of Ireland, England and France that I drew most heavily when envisioning my Faeries of the Wood triptych.

Faeries of the Wood is limited to 75 signed and numbered castings presented in cold-cast brass. Each piece is hand numbered, signed and mounted in an elegant beaded frame (available in black or aged walnut).

There is a large number of books available to those who are interested in exploring the world of Faeries. One of my go-to sources on the subject is Anna Franklin’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Fairies. I also enjoy the many books by Brian Froud, whom many consider to be the current embodiment of the faerie spirit.

As always, whether you choose to contact me privately or leave a public comment, I welcome your feedback and suggestions.

~Aric

In Honor of the Last Viking Invasion

950 years ago, two battles took place that mark what most consider to be the end of the Viking Age. In September 1066 at the battle of Stamford Bridge, an English army under King Harold Godwinson defeated the invading forces of the Norwegian King, Harald Hardrada, and his ally, the English king’s brother, Tostig Godwinson. By battle’s end, both Hardrada and Tostig along with most of the Norwegians lay dead on the field.

prow-sneak peek

Although Harold Godwinson repelled the Norwegian invaders, his Saxon army was defeated in turn by the Normans at the Battle of Hastings just a few short weeks later. Ironically, the Normans (or “North Men”) who ultimately emerged victorious were themselves the descendants of Vikings, so it could fairly be argued that, while Hardrada lost, the Norse ultimately did succeed in conquering all of England.

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To celebrate the Viking Age and the sea kings who left their indelible mark throughout Europe, on this 950th anniversary I am offering NINE of my Viking Prows at FIFTY dollars off through OCTOBER 14, 2016. The proceeds from these sales will fund my first official bronze edition in 2017 so you’ll not only get one of these prows at a great price, but you’ll be helping me expand my studio to include .

~Aric

 

 

Bracing for the Maelstrom

June ended on a wonderful note when the Fountain Square Art Festival honored me with the first place award for “Best in 3D Mixed Media & Sculpture.” This was my first show in Chicago as a sculptor and it was great fun to spend some time in my favorite city again.

Since returning home, I have been hard at work preparing for my most ambitious month yet – four shows in four weeks. Apart from all the production, I will also be unveiling a new piece at one of the shows.

So, for those who would like to see my work in person, here’s where to find me over the next month…

Tomorrow I leave for the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts, July 14-17. Sunshine magazine ranks this 4-day event the top juried art show in the USA and I am honored to be one of the showing artsts. You’ll find me in BOOTH B-39

2016-CentralPenn-Logo

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Two days after returning home, it’s off to the Ann Arbor Summer Arts Fair. This was one of the most enjoyable shows I did last year (not to mention the largest), and I highly recommend it to anyone in the A2 area July 21-24. You’ll find me in BOOTH 275 on Liberty and Main)

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Next stop will be the Huron Valley Arts Festival. This one-day event (July 30 from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm) will pack a lot of art in just 7 hours. (You’ll find me in BOOTH 3)

Huron-Valley-2016

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Finally, August 6 & 7 will find me at Fine Art at the Village. This two-day event is in Rochester Hills and, for those in the area who are not able to make the Art & Apples show in September, this is a great opportunity to see some art in the Rochester Hills area. The fair takes place amidst a high-end outdoor shopping mall (You’ll find me at the South end of the fair by the Whole Foods at BOOTH 6)

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I hope to see you at one of these shows.

~Aric Jorn

 

Free Trade from the North

With such a good start to my year, I want to thank all those who follow me and collect my work – both in the USA and around the world – with a rare promotion. For the entire month of June, all domestic orders (of $150 or more) will ship for free to anyone who follows my studio online. International clients will receive an instant $25 shipping reduction at checkout.

Regardless of how you choose to engage with my work – whether through my blog or on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or ETSY – your support and patronage is what allows me to continue sculpting and I sincerely appreciate your support.

To take advantage of this offer, simply follow one of my accounts (and if you’re reading this, you probably follow one already) and use the codes below at checkout on my ETSY store:

Domestic clients:  VikingShip2016
International clients:    VikingLongShip2016

Skål !!
~Aric Jorn

The Wolves of Ragnarok

A year and a half ago,  I created Odin’s Raven’s: Hugin & Munin. I greatly enjoyed working with a pairing of mythological creatures who were not only significant to the time and culture that created them but who’s wisdom still rings true today. So I’ve decided to follow it up with another powerful duo from Norse mythology, the Wolves of Ragnarok: Skoll and Hati. Just as Odin’s Ravens are a symbol of curiosity, awareness and the thirst for knowledge, The Wolves of Ragnarok are a symbol of endings, reminding us to live life while we can.

Wolves-of-Ragnarok-ETSY

Wolves appear in many mythologies but nowhere are they more central than in the ancient Scandinavian tradition and few events in Norse myth are as central as Ragnarok. It is the end of the world (literally “Twilight of the Gods”) and several wolves play key roles in the story.

So, who are Skoll and Hati?

Skoll and Hati are massive wolves who run through the heavens chasing the sun and moon. When Ragnarok is upon the world, they will catch their prey and swallow them whole, marking the end of the world we know and paving the way for a new world to begin.

However, this sobering image is not as bleak as it appears at first glance. Consider that the Norse gods know Ragnarok is inevitable – it will come no matter what they do – and when it comes, they too will cease to exist, pulled back into the chaotic void of Ganungagap from whence our universe was created and to which it must return. Yet they do not allow this fact to stop them from working hard to delay it, building up their world, finding joy, love, honor and adventure, engaging in everything life has to offer. In this sense, the symbol of Skoll and Hati as harbingers of unavoidable doom stand as a reminder that all things end and that we should use every moment we have on earth to the fullest.

About the art

This layered relief is created from four separate castings using cold-cast nickel silver, brass, copper and stone. Patinas, stains, inks and/or paints are applied and the individual pieces are buffed to bring out highlights. They are then assembled, clear coated and mounted in a black, glassless shadowbox. Wolves of Ragnarok: Skoll and Hati is limited to 150 signed and numbered pieces and is available here. I am also reserving a small number of matched sets that will include Odin’s Ravens and Wolves of Ragnarok with matching edition numbers.

Wolves-and-Ravens

Digging a little deeper into the story of Skoll and Hati…

The Eddic poem Grímnismál has a few passages that refer to Skoll and Hati. Here is the one that inspired me to create this piece (translated into English):

Skoll is the name of the wolf
Who follows the shining priest
Into the desolate forest,
And the other is Hati,
Hróðvitnir’s son,
Who chases the bright bride of the sky.

It is worth noting that “Hróðvitnir” (loosely translated as “Famous Wolf”) refers to Fenrir, Loki’s son. Fenrir is the enormous wolf who himself will be the death of Odin at the time of Ragnarok. It is therefore Hróðvitnir’s (Fenrir’s) children (Skoll and Hati) who will swallow the sun and moon. There is some dispute among academics as to which of these celestial wolves chases the sun and which the moon, and there is an interesting article on this dispute to be found here.

So, take the message of Skoll and Hati to heart and seize life while you can.

~Aric

I Have Been Involved In A Murder

Yes, it’s true, and I am not alone in bringing this murder about. In fact, there were dozens of us who contributed to it and, since no body will ever be found, I feel safe in admitting my involvement publicly on this blog. What’s more, I am inviting everyone who reads this post to witness the murder for themselves. It is taking place in Indiana – Terre Haute to be more precise – and it all begins tonight.

Now, before you reach for your cell and start dialing 9-1-1 to report this murder, perhaps I should explain…

Arts Illiana Gallery

Tonight, the Arts Illiana Gallery is unveiling The Crow Show, a juried exhibition running Feb 5 through April 22, featuring crow-themed work from artists in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. And, as we all know, a group of crows is referred to as a murder.

Crow Show

I was invited to have my “Odin’s Ravens: Hugin & Munin” relief in the exhibition and am delighted to have them in the collection especially as I am only a couple weeks away from releasing the second piece in this series. They (and all the other work on display at The Crow Show) will be available for sale throughout the 3-month event.

Odins_Ravens

Now, I know someone is bound to write in and say, “but, Aric, Odin had ravens, not crows,” so allow me to set the record straight. The term “crow” is used for an entire family of birds (Corvidae) that includes the raven species. To put it simply, all ravens are crows but not all crows are ravens, making The Crow Show a perfect place for Hugin and Munin to roost.

So, if over the next three months, you find yourself in a drivable distance from Terre Haute and have a free afternoon, I encourage you to stop by what promises to be a very unique exhibition of dark avian art and witness the murder for yourself.

~Aric Jorn